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There are orange-and-white cats and kittens everywhere you look at the Connecticut Humane Society. In the cat condos, in the upper respiratory infection room, in the medical department, in volunteer foster homes. They’re all members of a large cat “family” from a local home and overwhelmed caregiver.

What does it take to welcome dozens and dozens of kitties at once?

Partnering with animal control: A local animal control officer (ACO) was working with the owner to find a safe place for the kitties to go. There were 56 felines in the home, and while spay/neuter was a high priority for the group, medical care was also needed for runny noses, infected eyes, ear mites and other conditions. CHS partners with municipal animal control shelters across the state to provide pro bono veterinary care, and so the ACO turned to CHS for assistance. The ACO transported the cats to CHS in groups based on urgent or emerging medical needs.

A cleared schedule for the intake and medical teams: A group of 21 mama cats and kittens arrived at CHS first. That’s a lot of medical exams, weigh-ins, name-giving, and ear, eye and nose cleanings all at once! Plus, all of the kittens were nursing from multiple mama cats. Who belonged to who? The staff matched kittens to moms by weight, since everyone looked alike. The rest of the kitties came in smaller groups, with the same process being followed each time. Medical care will continue for the cats during their entire time with CHS.

Volunteer foster homes: Dozens of the kitties went right into foster homes. Mamas went with their litters so that they could have a quiet, cozy space of their own to raise their kittens. Other cats on medication for eye infections headed to volunteer foster homes so they could have lots of special attention while they healed.

Toys, towels, litter, litter boxes, and more litter boxes: The cats were set up with everything they needed to be comfy during their stay at CHS or in a volunteer foster home. And that meant tons of supplies. In fact, more are still needed. Want to donate to this group of kitties? They could really use some new litter boxes, all kinds of cat litter, gently used cat carriers, towels, and toys. They can be dropped off at or shipped to CHS Newington.

Soon…adopters: Some, like Lex, a 5-month-old kitty who always gets food on his nose, are ready for their new homes after getting treated for ear mites and being spayed/neutered. Most others are getting ready for their spays/neuters, continuing treatment for upper respiratory infections, or getting big and strong with their mama cats in a foster home. Their big going-home moments will be here before they know it!

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