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Bam story page

The new supervisor studied his staff members as they cared for pets in the Connecticut Humane Society’s medical department. A veterinarian was giving an exam, while an assistant checked on a patient recovering from surgery. A technician reviewed the day’s schedule. All while the supervisor sat in his favorite spot on the floor, taking it all in.

His name was Bam, and he was a black senior cat. Okay, maybe he wasn’t officially the boss, but it felt like it. The 10-year-old cat was staying in the veterinary department, and he knew the team’s routines like the back of his…uh, paw. That’s because Bam had diabetes and needed close daily monitoring.

Way back in June, he was found outside CHS, laying in the parking lot and soaking up the sun. He let his new friends at CHS pick him up and examine him, purring almost immediately. Staff members scanned Bam for a microchip, detected one, and soon reached a prior owner. While they hadn’t been able to keep Bam, they provided useful information in helping Bam move forward—including that he’d stopped using his litter box.

For many pets, bathroom problems are a sign they aren’t feeling well. CHS veterinarians ran tests to see if that was the case. And then, they discovered Bam’s stubborn, strong-willed, mind-of-its-own diabetes.

Veterinarians prescribed a special diet for gradual weight loss (which could help control his diabetes), as well as insulin shots. And so began the long journey to get Bam’s diabetes under control. July passed. So did August, then September. All of autumn. Blood tests showed the medical team was getting closer to regulating the condition, but more insulin adjustments were necessary.

Along the way, Bam became a fixture of the medical department. He was a good, quiet boy, who enjoyed laying on a pile of fresh towels and having so much to observe throughout the day.

Finally, this winter, after more than six months of care, Bam’s tests showed the diabetes was under control. He was ready for adoption.

Today, Bam is supervising in a new place: his home. He’s got parents to love, and even keeps a couple of dogs in line. And his family loves him, diabetes and all.

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